Supervisory Capital Assessment Program - SCAP


Supervisory Capital Assessment Program - SCAP
A financial stress test conducted by the Federal Reserve System to assess the capital buffers of U.S. banking organizations. The Supervisory Capital Assessment Program took place in the spring of 2009 during the financial crisis of 2008-2009 and was intended to measure the financial strength of the nation's 19 largest financial institutions going forward.

The stress tests were limited to banking organizations with assets in excess of $100 billion dollars; banks that the Fed considered "too big to fail". The requirements of the stress tests measured each institution's Tier 1 common capital against a baseline scenario and a hypothetical scenario that was deemed more adverse. The final results showed that 10 of the 19 banks were deemed to have inadequate capital. That being said, every bank tested met the legally mandated capital requirements.


Investment dictionary. . 2012.

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